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Welcome to InsurancesafeNZ

Welcome to Insurancesafenz.com. Whether you're travelling to study, work or simply explore the globe, it’s important to make sure that you have the right level of insurance cover to protect you in the event of unexpected loss or illness.

InsurancesafeNZ provides three different travel insurance policy categories: Studentsafe, Workersafe and Explorersafe. This means that if you’re travelling to New Zealand, travelling within New Zealand or temporarily leaving New Zealand, we have something to offer you. Use the Policy Finder to narrow your policy search and get a quote. Our website is also packed with great information on how to keep safe, how to make the most of your time abroad and how to understand your travel insurance policy better. If you need further assistance contact one of our friendly staff on our toll-free number 0800 486 004 (within NZ) or +64 9 488 1638 (outside of NZ).

Handling Exam Season Stress

Taking care of your sexual health

Taking care of your sexual health

If you’re reading this article, you’ve already made a sensible choice. If you’re in a new relationship, or thinking about starting to date, it’s important to think about how you can ensure that you and your partner stay safe when you’re having a little extra ‘fun’.

So read on to learn more about what steps you should be taking to keep safe. The consequences can range from irritating to life-threatening – and that isn’t a gamble anyone should take.

STI protection

What

Kiwi Workplace Etiquette

Kiwi Workplace Etiquette

Adjusting to a new workplace comes with challenges wherever you are in the world – and if you're in a new country as well as a new workplace, those changes can be even more extreme. New Zealand culture is quite friendly and informal, and this extends to many workplaces. But it can be difficult at times to understand where the limit is – how casual is too casual and what will make you look unprofessional? How formal is too formal and what will make you look too unapproachable?

Some of

Perfect Packing

Peace of mind creates the best adventure

Peace of mind creates the best adventure

Making sure you return from holiday with great memories

Travelling can be a real adventure – but an important part of any overseas experience is making sure that you keep yourself safe while you’re exploring.

When you’re planning adventures overseas, there’s so much excitement that it can be easy to forget about the parts of travel that are a little less glamorous. Organising travel insurance may not be as thrilling as planning your routes and researching the major attraction

Flatting on a Budget

Flatting on a Budget

Creating a rewarding lifestyle you can afford

There are always going to be some expenses when you’re moving to a new place – but there are plenty of ways to minimise the costs.

Flatting doesn’t have to be expensive. There are a number of ways you can set up a flat on a budget without losing out on quality and the occasional treat. To make sure that you get the best experience possible no matter what your income may be, we’ve brought together a few of our favourite tips and t

The best ways to escape the Kiwi Winter

The best ways to escape the Kiwi Winter

Escape the Kiwi winter – discovering the Pacific and Australia

Unless you’re really into skiing, winter in New Zealand isn’t really the most exciting time of year. It’s not cold enough for there to be pretty snow falling in the cities, but it’s still cold enough that you don’t want to spend time outside unless you have to. Instead of snow, we mostly get rain and wind. It’s certainly not terrible – but it does give you a good excuse to go somewhere sunny if you have the time and budge

Finding Hidden Gems

Keeping Safe and Healthy

Keeping Safe and Healthy

Looking after yourself when you’re caught up in your new life

Knowing how best to look after your health and look out for your safety is key to travelling with peace of mind.

No matter where you go in the world, someone will tell you to keep safe and often there’s a good reason for it. When travelling or moving somewhere new it can be tempting to step outside of your comfort zone and give everything a go. While this is a great attitude it’s important to explore your new surrou

How to make friends

How to make friends

How to make new friends while you’re studying abroad

It’s natural to feel homesick and very far away from friends and family while overseas – but there are some easy ways to find new friends wherever you may be!

When you’re away from your family and community that feeling of homesickness can feel very overwhelming. Making friends and keeping busy are the easiest ways to prevent homesickness – but you need to put the effort in. If you sit at your computer looking over your soci

Finding a place to call home

From Study To Salary

From Study To Salary

Simplifying the start of your working life in New Zealand

In order to get the best start possible when it comes to working in New Zealand we have some advice from those who have done it themselves!

For many people, the shift from university study to the working world is one of the biggest changes they will ever experience. Life until that point is focused on formal education – sitting in class, doing homework, taking notes… and then all of a sudden, it’s time to step out into

Transitioning from study to work

Keeping in touch

Keeping in touch

The best ways to stay in contact with those back home

While you’ll want to make new friends and connections while abroad, it’s really important not to forget about everyone back home.

Relocating to a new country for work is hugely exciting. Getting a new job and home and navigating new cultures, practices and languages is an immersive experience and can be incredibly consuming.

An “out with the old, in with the new” approach can be tempting – after all, you’re making a

Everybody needs good neighbours

Keeping Things Honest

Learning a foreign language

Learning a foreign language

Tips for expat parents

When you arrive in a new country, exchanging a few words of conversation with a local can help you to feel settled. It’s a great way to get to know people, and a useful skill to have for your time abroad. Here, we take a look at how expats parents can prepare themselves and their children for this challenge and provide some tips for successfully mastering the local lingo.

In general, the younger your children are the easier it will be for them to pick u

Moving overseas with a pet

Moving overseas with a pet

For many of us, our pets are part of the family. For expats intending to move overseas with their pet, planning and research before the move is essential. It is crucial to ensure the welfare of your beloved pet during and after transit, and that regulation surrounding the importation and exportation of pets is complied with.

Before you go:

Research animal import regulations for your new country of residence, to determine what conditions must be met for your pet to be allowed en

Making your travel dollar go further

Kiwi office etiquette

27/11/2018

Adjusting to a new workplace comes with challenges wherever you are in the world – and if you're in a new country as well as a new workplace, those changes can be even more extreme. New Zealand culture is quite friendly and informal, and this extends to many workplaces. But it can be difficult at times to understand where the limit is – how casual is too casual and what will make you look unprofessional? How formal is too formal and what will make you look too unapproachable?

Some of these things are hard to know until you have actually begun your role, or until you have a discussion with somebody who works there. To feel confident when you arrive in the office, here’s some advice about etiquette and customs in different workplaces in New Zealand.

What to wear on day one

The best way to understand what to wear to your first day is to pay attention when you’re being interviewed – what did your interviewer wear? If you saw other staff, what were they wearing? Your contract may have some information about dress code, but it may be something short and not very helpful, like ‘business casual’ or ‘smart business’. It can be hard to know what those things mean, but if you think about what you’ve seen other staff wearing, and maybe dress a little more formally than that for your first few days – it’s always good to make a great first impression.

One warning – if you happened to have your interview on a Friday, don’t base your clothing choices on what you’ve seen others wearing! Many companies have ‘casual Friday’, where staff have a lot more flexibility in what they can wear. So if you interviewed on a Friday and saw men wearing cargo shorts and women wearing jeans, don’t assume that that’s what they’ll be wearing during the rest of the working week.

If you’re unsure, you can get in touch with the person who you have been dealing with – potentially a hiring manager or member of their HR team. Or if in doubt, stick to a crisp shirt or blouse with a simple but smart pair of trousers or a skirt, and bring a blazer or suit jacket to go on top of everything. Most offices in New Zealand won’t require that men wear a tie, but if your industry is a particularly traditional one – perhaps a law firm or an accountancy business – then wear one just in case.

After a few days, you can get a better sense of what kind of wardrobe your colleagues have, and adjust what you’re wearing accordingly.


Understanding timing

Some people think of New Zealand as being an island paradise, perhaps imagining something tropical where everyone’s on ‘island time’. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. Yes, we’re part of Polynesia, but we’re decidedly further south of tropical climates, and our business environment is much more similar to other ‘western’ countries than resembling some kind of fantasy island life.

So make sure you’re on time or early – whether it’s for a meeting or just to start the working day. On the topic of the working day, it’s good to know that most offices will have standard hours set as 8:30am to 5:00pm. More and more workplaces are adopting flexible working conditions, but that doesn’t mean that you can just turn up whenever you feel like it. Instead, some staff members may elect to start their days earlier or later than normal, and end their day earlier or later accordingly.

All that being said, it’s not a major disaster if you are late to the office occasionally – but it is respectful to let your manager or supervisor know. Especially in cities like Auckland, where the traffic can be terrible, everyone has had their morning commute delayed in some way at some point. Most people will be very cooperative – just send a polite text message or give them a quick call, and thank them for their understanding when you do arrive.


Food and drink

Most offices will provide staff with kitchen space, including tea and coffee making supplies at the very least. Sometimes that will mean a kettle, some mugs and a couple of containers of tea bags or instant coffee – but increasingly, especially at larger companies, there will be a fancy espresso machine of some kind. Don’t be afraid to use the facilities, whether it’s learning to make a latte or using the shared fridge for your lunch. Just consider others when you’re bringing food with you – you won’t be too popular if you bring something that smells strongly of fish. The kitchen and lunchroom space is a valuable place to get to know staff members who aren’t in your immediate team – you never know who you might make friends with while you’re eating your sandwiches or having a cup of tea!

Many offices will have Friday night drinks, when wine and beer and other beverages are provided to staff, usually with some snacks as well. This will typically be after 5pm, but can sometimes start a little earlier in more relaxed office environments. These are optional to participate in but are another good way to meet your co-workers in a more relaxed environment. There will usually be non-alcoholic drinks available too, if you prefer, and most workplaces will have a two-drink maximum to avoid any inebriation.


Workplace hierarchy

Compared to many other western countries, New Zealand has a high proportion of small-to-medium enterprises or businesses (SME). It’s probably something to do with our country’s mentality of ‘kiwi ingenuity’, where everyone likes to think that they have the next great idea – and sometimes, they do!

These smaller workplaces tend to mean a flatter hierarchy than many people who have worked in corporate environments may be used to. Your manager and your manager’s manager may all sit in the same area as you, and consider themselves to be all part of the same team, just with slightly different responsibilities. As such, mutual respect is really important – whether someone is your ‘superior’ or reporting to you. As well as being very supportive of ingenuity and creativity, New Zealand is a very egalitarian society for the most part – everyone is treated equally, or that’s the aim, anyway.

Māori influence

Some of the ways that New Zealanders live their day-to-day lives, including in the workplace, are influenced by Māori traditions and beliefs. It’s an important way to acknowledge the first people to call this land home, and integrate tradition with modern practices. Many of these Māori traditions – or tikanga Māori – are rooted in spirituality, so respecting them is the right thing to do, even if you don’t fully understand them.

One common tradition that is observed by many New Zealanders is avoiding sitting on tables, particularly any tables that are used for food preparation. It’s considered very rude to put your bottom on the same surface that people eat from. Similarly, some people who are particularly careful about respecting Māori tikanga will also avoid putting down eye glasses or hats on tables that might be used for food. The head is very tapu (sacred), and so anything that touches the head is tapu too.

In some organisations, especially if you work in the public sector, you may get the chance to participate in formal ceremonies that include Māori protocol. This may include a blessing, or karakia, which will typically be non-denominational unless you work for an explicitly Christian organisation. Often you will be invited to participate in a waiata, or traditional song – there are a few common ones that many New Zealanders will already be familiar with – Te Aroha is an easy one to pick up as it only has four lines!Adjusting to a new workplace comes with challenges wherever you are in the world – and if you're in a new country as well as a new workplace, those changes can be even more extreme. New Zealand culture is quite friendly and informal, and this extends to many workplaces. But it can be difficult at times to understand where the limit is – how casual is too casual and what will make you look unprofessional? How formal is too formal and what will make you look too unapproachable?

Some of these things are hard to know until you have actually begun your role, or until you have a discussion with somebody who works there. To feel confident when you arrive in the office, here’s some advice about etiquette and customs in different workplaces in New Zealand.

Ultimately, New Zealand offices are relaxed environments where people understand that we are all only human – and we all might make mistakes, whether with our work or with our workplace etiquette. So try your best, but if you make a mistake, apologise and move on – you’ll know for next time.

Other language considerations

Māori’s not the only language to think about at work, of course. The way we communicate in English is also important to think about. Some New Zealanders are quite fond of swearing, but it really isn’t appropriate in the workplace – although not everyone has gotten that memo. So even if one of your deskmates has a potty mouth, don’t follow suit.

But things are also fairly informal in many ways – just not so informal as to allow expletives in the workplace! Regardless of seniority, most of your colleagues will be known by their first names – if there’s anyone who is more traditional, your colleagues will tend to warn you. But even CEOs and directors will usually be known by their first name, so don’t be afraid to copy your colleagues and do the same. Just because you call someone John rather than Mr Smith doesn’t mean you don’t respect them!

Ultimately, New Zealand offices are relaxed environments where people understand that we are all only human – and we all might make mistakes, whether with our work or with our workplace etiquette. So try your best, but if you make a mistake, apologise and move on – you’ll know for next time.